Sessions

Level: Beginner

Most embedded computing products run Linux. However, obtaining the complete, corresponding source code (CCS), which Linux's license (GPL) requires, can prove difficult. The license dictates technical requirements; verification of a source code release for license compliance therefore requires technical analysis. After years of reviewing such CCS releases, the speaker discovered (finally!) an excellent example, which not only meets GPL's requirements, but also encourages users to take advantage of their rights to modify and install new versions of the software.

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Speaker: Doug Copeland
Level: Beginner

Controlling devices through implanted chips used to be purely science fiction. Now, through the efforts of brave souls known as grinders this type of biohacking, and other do-it-yourself body modification, is not just reality, this movement is becoming more widespread, as it gets assimilated and adopted by tech enthusiasts. See this world from the fresh eyes of a would-be grinder, with a background in tech support and ministry, as he himself explores his own creation amplified through current, off-the-shelf technology.

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Speaker: Mark Greene
Level: Intermediate

"Hadoop". What does it mean anymore? The rapid adoption of Hadoop across industries and sectors has generated much excitement. World-wide, companies have embraced Hadoop in ways that only FOSS can be - Improve it. Add to it. Evangelize it!

It is easy for newcomers to be overwhelmed by the number of software projects that surround and support Hadoop today.

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Speaker: Kent Wolfe
Level: Beginner

When it comes to troubleshooting network related issues on a Linux host, often times, the first step most administrators take is disabling the host-based firewall. Did you know that this imposes security risks? What if the host-based firewall wasn’t the issue and it was actually tcp wrappers? Or, what if a process was only listening on localhost? As the list of things to check and troubleshoot grows, what if we can use a tool like tcpdump to make the job easier?

In this talk, we will cover:

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Level: Intermediate

Secrets come in many forms, passwords, keys, tokens. All crucial for the operation of an application, but each dangerous in its own way. In the past, many of us have pasted those secrets in to a text file and moved on, but in a world of config automation and ephemeral microservices these patterns are leaving our data at greater risk than ever before.

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Speaker: Kevin Monroe
Level: Beginner

In this talk, Kevin will explore the idea of BigData DumbOps -- not "dumb" because standing up a Big Data stack is trivial or easy, but "dumb" because it should be. Few people give much thought to apt-get install foo. Why can’t ’foo’ be a multi-node Big Data solution, complete with ingestion, processing, and visualization components? The hard part with solving Big Data problems is in the deployment and configuration of all the services that need to work together (NameNodes, DataNodes, ResourceManagers, oh my).

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Speaker: Michael Beam
Level: Advanced

Factom is a Decentralized, Open Source platform that secures arbitrary data in an immutable, censorship-resistant Blockchain. Factom Entries are collected and hashed into a Merkle Tree; then the Merkle Root is anchored into the Bitcoin Blockchain, allowing applications to create immutable, provably timestamped audit trails for any documents.

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Speaker: Rob Landley
Level: Intermediate

The most common type of computer in the world today is an Android phone, and so far all its software is cross compiled from PCs. But these days PCs are the new big iron, being kicked up into the server space ("The Cloud") like the mainframe and minicomputer before it.

How do we wean three billion Android devices off their dependence on half a billion old PCs? How do we make having an Android phone sufficient to be a full-fledged Android developer, up to and including modifying and rebuliding the operating system itself?

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Speaker: Sean Carolan
Level: Intermediate

Compliance and security are the next steps after Infrastructure as Code and Test-Driven Infrastructure in expanding your DevOps workflow. Chef's open-source InSpec and audit cookbooks provide an accessible pattern for building compliance into your continuous delivery pipelines.

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Speaker: Ted Gould
Level: Beginner

Ubuntu is creating a core operating system that spans from small connected devices in your home to super computers. We are also building a user experience based on that core which spans from pocket-sized phones through multi-monitor desktop powerhouses. Take a look at the make-up and distribution of Ubuntu Core using Snappy. See how the Unity experience adjusts for screen size and input devices. Learn how you can make convergent apps and use Ubuntu Core to build solutions all over the computing spectrum.

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Speaker: Adam Miller
Level: Intermediate

Currently the defacto standard for teams following a DevOps working model to deliver containerized applications is Docker. Docker provides many advantages and new workflows but it also introduces many new challenges. One of those challenges is providing a build environment that is Reproducible, Auditable, and Definable. This effectively means that we may reproduce the same output given the same set of inputs and we know what those inputs are, we can audit the build pipeline in order to verify our content, and the content is well defined such that it is predictable.

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Level: Beginner

Ell Marquez will be presenting:

The technology industry has been rapidly growing for some time and as the industry grew there has been a shift in our mind set. As we could no longer fill all the roles that were needed, there came a push to diversify, to bring in new blood and new ideas. In order to recruit this new blood we began to develop a community intended to foster and promote the growth of these individuals.

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Speaker: David Anders
Level: Intermediate

This presentation starts with a historical look at open tools and how they have influenced open hardware development as part of the Maker/Hacker movement, followed by a survey of how to create simple open hardware tools to aid in debugging everything from simple microcontrollers to linux kernel drivers, and ends with a discussion of the future of user created open diagnostic and debug tools. Anyone working with embedded systems has had at one time or another been required to debug a piece of hardware or coax a buggy kernel driver into working.

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Speaker: David Chiluk
Level: Intermediate

Have you ever wondered where all those "updates" you download regularly actually come from?
This will be a how-to for any developers interested in how to contribute code back to Ubuntu.

It will cover:
Launchpad, bug submital, and bug etiquette
Getting The Sources
Changing the Sources
Ubuntu Unstable Development Processes
Ubuntu Stable Release Processes
Ubuntu Kernel Maintenance Processes

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Speaker: Dru Lavinge
Level: Intermediate

Every software project needs good documentation--otherwise, how will users know how to use the software and developers know how to contribute code to the project? But creating and maintaining documentation is hard! Software versions change, new features are added (and old ones deprecated), formats change, and search engines seem to point users to everything but the correct docs.

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